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AG260: Born to Run - Running Contacts

Instructor: Jen Pinder

Course Details

Running contacts seems to be everywhere these days. Whether a dog runs her a-frame or dogwalk, you see it every weekend. Everyone wants them, but teaching them and maintaining them can be challenging.

This course is designed to teach or retrain a dog to run both the dogwalk and aframe. By the end of the class we will have your dog running a full height dog walk or aframe and performing basic handling off of it. We will do this by breaking down the behavior of “just running” into several different foundation skills. Teaching running contacts is more than just doing repetition. Its a process of teaching several parts of the behavior and then putting it together. Just as in teaching other complex behavior chains, it is important to communicate to the dog what behaviors are expected and in which order. This way we have clear expectations for both handlers and dogs. All handlers must understand the basics of clicker training or verbally marking a behavior.

For this class you will need access to an adjustable dog walk and aframe. For the early phases of this class, however, all you will need is: a training space 50’ in length, some carpet runners or yoga mats, toys, and food. Training aids such as a manners minder is helpful but not required.

Registration

There are no scheduled sessions for this class at this time. We update our schedule frequently, so please subscribe to our mailing list for notifications.

Registration begins at 930am PDT

Enrollment limites: 15 gold, 25 silver, unlimited bronze. If you are interested in a bronze level spot you can sign up any time during the enrollment period.

Syllabus

Curriculum by week

Week 1

a. Teaching forward focus 

b. Teaching your dog to run in a straight line on the flat 

c. Teaching your dog to run on a matt or carpet

d.  Teaching the basics of loading on straight to the plank.  When, where, and  why, and how to teach approaches.

Week 2

a. Teaching your dog to send in a straight line up to a distance to 40-50 feet

b. Teaching your dog to send down a plank   

c. Adding distractions on the flat.  Why is adding distractions this early in the game important?

d. Teaching the basics of “foot targeting”

e.  When and where to use foot targeting.   

Week 3

a.  Raising your plank up to a foot (or two)

b. Teaching your dog to send in a straight line with you running behind her.

c.  Adding obstacles after the plank (e.g. tunnel, jump, etc). 

Week 4

a. Raising the board up to 3 feet and work straight off exits.

b. Adding in your motion.  When, where, and why.

c. How to teach your dog to run relaxed when you are ahead.

d. Adding in distractions to running on the foot high plank.

Week 5

a. Increase the distance from end of board to obstacle.  Work up to 50 feet between obstacles.  Why is this important? 

b. Introduce backchaining.  Why it is important and where should your dog look.

c. Add lead in obstacles to get different approaches onto plank

d. Add more distractions into your setup.   

Week 6

a.  Raising the plank to full height.

b.  Add in leading in obstacles.

c. Teaching your dog to adjust her stride.  When, where, and why

d.  Where do we go from here?  

Prerequisites and Equipment

For this class you will need access to an adjustable dog walk and aframe. For the early phases of this class, however, all you will need is: a training space 50’ in length, some carpet runners or yoga mats, toys, and food. Training aids such as a manners minder is helpful but not required.

Course Testimonials

FDSA is very excited to welcome Jen Pinder as a new instructor and AG260 as a new course for the August 2015 term.